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20120926
20121004
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, and the economy will be front and center. what are the important economic numbers to listen for? >> susie: and metro p.c.s. says "hello" to t-mobile, in a merger that will make t-mobile the fourth largest wireless carrier in the country. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: private sector hiring was surprisingly perky in september. that's according to data out just two days before the government's crucial and more complete monthly jobs report. payroll processor a.d.p. said employers added 162,000 jobs last month, stronger than expected. but the pace is slowing, and numbers for july and august were revised lower. still, there are signs the job market is improving, but no where close to replenishing the jobs lost in the great recession. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: few things would make more americans happy than a healthy job market. from recent college grads to president obama, their future might look more certain if companies really ramped up hiring. economists say there's too much uncertainty on the horizon for that to happen any time soon. the good news is that fi
all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost fo
we begin with discouraging news about the sluggish economy. by the broadest measurement, economic growth slowed sharply in the second quarter. the gross domestic product was revised considerably lower today. growth was 1.3% in the april through june period. just a month ago, the estimate was 1.7%. add that to a big drop in purchases of big ticket items, like washing machines and furniture. in august, durable goods orders fell 13.2%, and you've got an economy that's just muddling along. but one ray of encouragement-- fewer people filed for unemployment benefits for the first time last week. clai fell by 26,000 to their july lows of 359,000 claims. on wall street, the dow jumped 72 points, the nasdaq added almost 43 points, the s&p up 13. while the u.s. continues working through problems left over by the great recession, there are big new challenges ahead in the form of the fiscal cliff and the ongoing mess in europe. darren gersh tonight takes a look at the risks ahead and the prospects for the economy's one clear bright spot, housing. >> reporter: this muddle-through economy of ou
on persuading voters they can boost the economy. but a key question at the heart of it all-- is the economy slowing, stalling, or perhaps even gaining strength in some ways? new data are sending conflicting signs. republican presidential nominee mitt romney campaigned today at a military academy in pennsylvania. romney promised better jobs for young people like the cadets sitting behind him and a better future for the entire country. >> we're in a very different road than what i think the people of the world expected from the united states of america. and if i'm elected president of this country, i will get us back on a road of growth and prosperity and strength. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of l
, and for government to withdraw support from the economy as the tories have done since 2010 has really been a recipe for a double dip recession and sure enough we have got one. >> you actually have got an interesting case study, america is a much bigger economy than the uk but our two countries were dealing with the financial crisis more or less in the same way. >> yes. >> a new government came in, not just austerity but masochism that is being -- >> by each other --. there is masochism in the uk with respect to the economic, a collector austerity around europe which is related, a separate point. >> the uk laboratory has been used to test the thesis that by contracting government spending you presto expand private enterprise. it hasn't worked and that way we ended up with a simple national -- >> why is that? >> because the private sector is not spending, sitting on 750 billion pounds of cash and not investing, consumers ve heirwits frightened out of them, export markets are slack, presto, if all of the indicators are point manager the wrong direction you have no growth. >> but the debate comes down
for life, and until last july he was italy's minister of economy and finance. but he is not exactly a politician. as a respect economist considered be abo party politics he was chosen to form a new technocratic government. it put him at the center of the european debt crisis confronting rising interest rates that led to greece, ireland, and portugal to seek bailouts. his ability to turn calamity into opportunity has revived his nickname "super mario." i have pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. welcome. >> delighted to be here. >> rose: i see that you have said that you're not going to run for pri minister? >> no, i can confirm that i will not be a candidate. i believe i couldn't even be a candidate because, as you mentioned, i am senator for life. so candidates are candidates inn order to become members of parliament. >> rose: and you're senator for life. >> yes. >> rose: do you want to stay as prime minister? >> of course i will not. i will-- the whole government will have to resign when the elections take place, probably next-- after that, it will be for th
oversight council headed by the us treasury said it is preparing to act to protect the economy. >> if investors get any sense that there might be a failure, they'll all race for the exit. and that's the equivalent of a run on the bank and there is no one there-- no one like a parent with capital or the fdic to supply capital if there's that kind of race for the et. >> reporter: three options are on the table. instead of a fixed value of $1, money market funds could be required to use a floating value. regulators are also considering whether money market fund companies should hold some of their assets as a buffer against a surge in withdrawals or whether to require investors to wait before they can get back a portion of their money. the s.e.c. could try again to pass new rules, but if it doesn't, the stability council could decide some big money market funds need closer regulation. that idea worries fund companies. >> it would result in significantly more costs and regulation and who would want to invest in a fund that the federal government has designated as systemically import
. on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacyn the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel's prime minter warned again today that iran iwelln its way to creating a nuclear weapon and said the world needs to act. benjamin netanyahu spoke at the united nations. as he has often before, netanyahu condemned iran and its nuclear program, and called on other leaders to do the same. >> at stake is not merely the future of my country. at stake is the future of the world. and nothing could imperil our common future more than the arming of iran with nuclear weapons. >> woodruff: the israeli prime minister said the hour is, quote, "getting late" to sto
been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: three months after upholding president obama's health care law, the supreme court is back with a docket that may even rival last year's term for drama. the justices will decide a case on affirmative action in higher education, and are expected to take up disputes on same-sex marriage, civil rights law, and more. the term opened today with arguments in another controversial case: whether businesses can be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. welcome back. >> nice to be back. brown: let us spulate, as the lawyers sa that last year was a blockbuster. >> absolutely. brown: new this term has some potential its
? >> thank you very much. very good morning to you. really the u.s. economy in major focus and job creation in the u.s. economy is the number one focus coming up in a lot of the -- in the presidential debates kicking off today. so that's going to be a focus there. and of course, the big focus on the big jobs numbers coming up on friday. but let's have a look to see how the nikkei and topix are kicking off. both margins trading marginally in the positive. 8,774 for the nikkei, and 3730 for the topix, up just .5% in the first almost ten minutes of trading. the nikkei ended lower yesterday for the fourth day in a row due to uncertainties over the u.s. economy, and lot of questions about china as it remains on holiday for most of this week. we had the private sector employment numbers, adp numbers, out of the u.s. yesterday which was a positive. it did show an increase. and also we had the ism services or non-manufacturing figures as well which did show growth. but the focus really now is on what the fed will do following its move of qe3 or its next stage of quantitative easing depending on thi
hoarding cash during the recession and are now eager to spend it on new homes on signs the overall economy is improving. but that increased demand has brought more competition for lots. >> now you have end users who are buying for themselves, you have other builders who are doing spec homes, so lot prices have gone up significantly in the last ten months. >> reporter: new home prices are also rising. the commerce department said last month alone they were up more than 11%. but while this is all good news for an economy that hasn't had much of it lately, morningstar economist robert johnson says the market still has to make up a lot of lost ground. >> if you look at housing starts at the peak we were over two million starts. i'd say based on population the number should have been about a million ana half. now we're down around 750,000 in terms of housing starts so we're kind of half of what i view as normal. >> reporter: one wild card for builders is the ongoing uncertainty about the bush tax cuts. subkowiak says if those tax cuts aren't extended some potential buyers could put a hold on bu
the economy. to what extent are the low rates motivating consumers to spend? >> i frankly don't buy that too much. i think there's a problem because you hurt people's interest income, and people with interest income could spend more, and the problem is people aren't able to access the low rates. you need a very high credit score to get the low rates and everybody that can access the low rates has done it, and if the rates were higher banks wouldn't require as high of a credit score. they're selling what they can through fany and fedy freddie. it's about credit scores and not interest rates. >> susie: aside from what banks are doing. what has to change, to change consumer attitudes about spending? >> the economy has to get better. we've had this in the summer for the past two or three years in a row, and every economy rebounds. if we're going to have a rebound in the holiday season, that could be great and help to put people back to work, and allow them to spend a little bit more freely. we also have a long holiday season. november starts out on a thursday, which means thanksgiving comes earl
a sluggish global economy. and there is concern more companies could follow suit. it wasn't all bad news on wall street. we actually got some pretty positive economic numbers. now, u.s. consumer confidence rose to its highest level in seven months in the month of september. we got housing data, housing prices rose at a faster than expected pace in the month of july. getting mixed signals about the stift u.s. and the global economy and will continue toe a major focus for investors worldwide. ate of the u.s. and l economy and will continue to be a major focus for investors worldwide. here in tokyo, investors will take a wait and see stance, moves driven by external fact to including europe's debt problems and overnight falls on wall street. now, spain is preparing a new round of austerity measures this week for the next fiscal budget. that is going to be a major focus. >> here in japan, we have the main opposition liberal democratic party's presidential election today. is that expected to effect the stock market? >> analysts are expecting it to be a factor for date because candidates have
. >>> vietnam and other southeast asian economies are in line to benefit from the tensions. >> reporter: members of the commerce and industry have visited capital this week. the group is headed by the chairman. they have meetings with vietnam's minister of industry and trade and the representative of the chairman of commerce. the goal is to expand their business in the country. following the recent japan protest he's growing anxious about china. employees with their own business were to remain inside their hotel. >> translator: i cannot easily dispel my risks about operating in china. it made me think we should start considering moving our business somewhere else. >> reporter: vietnam has been trying to end foreign problems. the timing couldn't be better for vietnam. >> translator: the people have positive feelings about japan. they are facing problems but we don't have to worry. in that sense there's no mental stress. >> reporter: east asian countries look impressive. >>> spanish leaders are poised to make stringent cuts in their latest budget plans. they too are tighten their belts. ramin, you
globalizations as an opportunity. they want an open society, an open economy, a society where you tolerate and respect people, a different faiths and cultures and then the closed minded who really have a view that if you don't accept my view then are you an alien or an enemy. i think that is the battle that is going on and in the end, i think it's important always, and i always say this to people in america to realize-- realize that for all the pictures of extremist that you see in people burning the american flag and protesting and so on, you also then have a lot of people who wanted same type of society and free society that we want. >> rose: has the is palestinian-israeli situation gotten off the front burner for too long and you can bring it back? >> well, it's a good question. not for the people out in the region, by the way. >> rose: it has not gotten off the front burner. >> no, i still believe that it's central to the future of the region. look, i have just come back from my last-- it was my 88th visit there. my wife said to me it is not actually the number of visits you made, it's
. >> they are the ones who own the businesses and they are the ones who are putting the money back in the economy and providing the jobs so i believe you know that would be a better plan for us. >> woodruff: 24-year-old athletic trainer sarah abrams also voted for mr. obama. but this time around, she says she's undecided. >> i'm not sure yet. i'm still like you know like watching and basically researching so i'll make my decision soon. >> woodruff: o.s.u. senior krystina hollowell says she identifies with the republican party, but has more liberal views on social issues than candidate mitt romney. do you know how you are going to vote yet? >> no, to be honest, i really don't. i'm more of i like lean towards republican but then socially i'm romney is like very against like abortions and like birth control and that type of stuff for like women and same with like gay marriages. i'm more towards like obama's plan. >> woodruff: in fact, peter levine, director of the center for information and research on civic learning and engagement at tufts university says one set of issues that could hurt romney wi
on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama faced an international audience today against the backdrop of a reelection campaign at home and anti-american violence abroad. the president took the stage at the unitedded nations urging the assembledded leaders to address the wave of anger across the muslimorld. >> the attacks of last two weeks are not simply an assault on america. they're also an assault on the very ideals upon which the united nations was founded. if we are serious about these ideals, we must speak honestly about the deeper causes of the crisis. because
. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investing billions of dollars in r&d around the globe to have the heart of tomorrow's innovations. by inve
of the day, women care about the economy, jobs and government spending and they will capture the vote on some of those issues. >> we have consensus. i think it will motivate the base which i think is a strategy of the republican party but it n't close the gap. >> we are all in agreement. this won make or break the election of the romney/ryan ticket. it's about the economy and other issues that are more important. >> if it's supposed to -- and you're right, it's a base motivator but if it's supposed to be a base motivator and the polls show romney really falling behind at this point, is it going to help? >> i don't finish she falling behind. there are so many polls out there that you can look at. but it really -- >> most recent abc news, washington post, and those kind of polls have shown us is that activityically significant gap andn the battle ground states, it's even worse like in ohio. all of a sudden they were neck-and-neck and a few months ago, romney was ahead and obama is 6 or 7 points ahead. >> you have to look at enthusiasm in those numbers and i think that is where they are aiming f
political tensions between japan and china is affecting the economy. do you see that happening through the stock markets? >> indeed. investors will continue to keep a close eye on the political tensions between japan and china. we are, in fact hearing more news that the tension -- the rift is affecting japanese businesses and corporate activity. on wednesday, ana said that 40,000 seat reservations have been cancelled. we will keep an eye on china related issues. >>> turning to the currency market the yen gained ground against the dollar and the euro. the euro/yen around $99.99. euro/yen hit a two-week low of around 99.70 in european trading and that led to gns in the yen against the dollar, that pair pretty much remained in european trading and new york trading. back to you. >> catch you later. >>> japanese firms are asking mean mar to improve the business environment for foreign companies. it is attractive due to its rapid economic reforms. the chairman of the japan chamber of commence met with an official in the capital. he asked for swifter measures to ensure a stable supply of powe
aid. >> we can employ people for a time, but can't sustain the economy for a long term. it can't pull the whole cart, because at some point the money runs out. an assistance program that helps unleash free enterprise can create enduring prosperity. >> the calls at the u.n. for outlawing offensive speech produces strong defenses of such speech not only by president obama but also from leaders in the american muslim community. i want to explore that with kim lawton managing editor of the program and the director of the muslim office of the public affairs council. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> how are you american muslims trying it to persuade other muslims around the world that putting any kind of limit on free speech is dangerous? >> well, i think the first way we're trying to convince fellow m muslims of this is the fact that the idea of free speech is a foundational part of the koran itself. we don't only believe in terms of americans and our belief in the constitution, but the koran challenges folks to engage in dialogue and in discourse. it challenges people of the same fai
with the economy? how are they going to solve the deficit problem and also increase job creation?" and i'd like to hear that explained clearly, because they have two very different philosophies. third, i think that if the debates do their job, we're going to be able to answer the question, "what are the sacrifices either one is going to ask us to make?" >> such as reforming social security, medicare, higher taxes, lower taxes? >> yes. and onhe table are all sorts of things that many people value a great deal and we may not be able to afford anymore. so should we have deductibility for second home mortgages? should we have deductibility for high-cost homes? should we have health insurance coverage provided by employers continue to be deductible? if so, for whom, should it be for all? and should we raise the age of entitlement, if so, to what level?" when someone says that about social programs, i want to also hear the answer to the question, "what are you doing with military spending? and how do you justify the tradeoff? we've gotta get the revenue someplace. where are you willing to cut? and if
company? >> so it was nch the mid-'90s, it was a disaster in the economy of russia. >> rose: you were a financial expert. >> and you know like it was the station where, like different companies in the cities they were on the verge of dying. >> rose: right. >> and we were young, ambitious, risky and we were not afraid of nothing. so we bought a very bad enterprise. >> rose: you made a big bet? >> yes, because at the time we did our best in order to find partners abroad. nobody came because it was too risky. we spent a lot of money, we spent a lot of hours, two and three hours a day, now we can show that this, for example, entity are one of the most profitable entities in the field production of nickel and platinum and palladium. but it was risky at the time because we have debt, more than one year to know the company. can't imagine this. and in the far north people they have no opportunity to receive salary for more than a half year. it was like really a disaster. it was a great disaster. and really we're very proud. >> rose: with so much at stake it all together was not cessarily safe
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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